FAQ

I am a professional technical writer, trainer, and commercial translator. I am also a self-taught nutritionist. My being self-taught irritates some health professionals like a fly in their soup. (I also have a certificate from an accredited part-time nutrition school in Belgium.) By reading books, attending conferences, and trying things, I collected ideas, put them into practice for myself, gained health, lost weight, and felt better. I would like to diffuse these ideas and the related methods and recipes. On the other hand, what works for me may not work for you. Nothing works for everybody; however, these ideas and the related methods make it possible for you to personalize your nutrition, to gain health, and to lose weight.

Because these ideas and the related methods work. I am simply the messenger. You do not need to believe me. To verify, you can read the books, studies, and articles in the references. Many of these books were written by unconventional medical doctors. By the end of their careers, they collected many observations and noticed patterns that confirmed their ideas about health via food. I simply read their books and summarized them in a set of articles and also added recipes.

This website is a hobby for me for now, for my health, and for possible offers of health coaching services, but only if the first customer’s forecast revenue will pay for the yearly fixed costs (overhead) of self-employment, legal administration, and tax compliance.

If you try one idea, such as food combining, an acid-alkaline balance, or blood type eating, with discipline, then there is an eighty percent chance that you will see measurable results in one to three weeks. If you try at least ideas, such as detox and the other three, then there is a ninety-nine percent chance that you will see measurable results, such as weight loss, and will feel better, within one to three weeks, but without falling off the wagon. I can guarantee this, conditionally.

I am not trying to impose any of these ideas. If not solicited, I do not wish to tell you what to eat or not to eat. I do not expect you to do anything. What you eat or not eat is your choice. The question is, what do you value more - your health or your habits? If you value your health more, then it is possible to apply these ideas gradually, one-by-one, week-by-week or month-by-month. Then see how you feel. For simple, practical details, read the “sexy seven” recipes.

Eggs or small portions of healthy, high-quality hamburger, turkey, or liver can be economic options. For details, read this Guide to Eating Paleo on a Budget. If you are a vegan, then oatmeal, rice, beans, lentils, buckwheat, peas, and alfalfa or soy sprouts can be healthy and less expensive sources of protein than processed foods. Local, seasonal fruits and vegetables can also be less expensive than others.

To further save money, on a strict household budget, you can plan your meals weekly or every three days. Then shop around, and buy your food according to your plan. If you buy local vegetables and fruits when they are in season, or else grow your own, then they cost less. Buying directly from local farmers can be less expensive, depending on the transport. Community-supported agriculture can be an economic option.

Even in a cold winter, root vegetables, such as carrots, parsnips, and turnips, are often in season. You can save money by buying nuts and seeds in bulk and buying fresh or frozen ingredients and then preparing them yourself. This avoids the cost of buying packaged processed meals and heating them in the microwave.

One reason that certain foods, particularly processed foods, are so cheap is that they are subsidized. The price does not reflect the true cost, including the subsidies, the de-mineralization of the soil, and some often unsavory labor practices. If you believe that “if God had meant for me to cook, then why did he invent restaurants?“, then even you can learn to make smoothies, to cut and steam vegetables, and to cook omelets.

The price of bad health often greatly exceeds the costs of vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, and either eggs and beef, or else rice, beans, grains, and legumes, even organic. By the way, on average over one year, you eat more or less one thousand kilograms of food (about two thousand two hundred pounds). Do you really think that this does not affect your health?

First of all, I am not preaching anything. I am simply presenting ideas. There is no moral judgement or shame implied in any of these ideas and articles. I am not offering personal advice. Depending on availability, it is mostly your choice  what you eat or do not eat. Second, yes, for my health, I tend to follow these methods, and mostly I do eat according to these ideas, using the basic recipes. My health is my greatest treasure.

For my health, mostly I drink smoothies (or real lemonade), eat steamed vegetables and raw fruit, cook omelets (or turkey or beef) with onions, spinach, and mushrooms, eat nuts and seeds, and flavor with a liberal use of herbs and spices. My shopping list of foods I eat is OptimalFoodsforMyHealth. This list also includes foods I avoid. Occasionally, I contradict myself for various reasons. My favorite contradiction is dark chocolate, which has some sugar. Also, contrary to blood type eating, I eat coconut oil, Brazil nuts, and drink apple cider vinegar. I am not suggesting that you eat like this. I suggest that you think about the ideas, discuss them, and then choose to act or not. What works for me may not work for you. I suggest that you think for yourself, and make your own choices.

Complementary exercise is healthy for me too.

In my opinion, my health depends mostly of all on eating foods that are healthy for me and then possibly on supplements. The best supplements for me are good-quality herbs and spices, such as ginger, clove, parsley, rosemary, thyme, garlic, cayenne pepper, fenugreek, cumin, and coriander. I also enjoy herbal tea of nettle, horsetail, dandelion, peppermint, and stevia.

If I take a supplement, I tend to pulse it. In other words, I take it for a week, then stop for a few days, then take it again for a week, then stop, and so on. If I take a supplement, I first ask myself: why? What do I hope to get from this food, spice, or supplement?

If available, sometimes I add one or more of the following foods, spices, and supplements to my daily smoothies (for these reasons): he shou wu (zinc), chlorella (magnesium & detox), Brazil nuts (selenium), clove (manganese), ginger (copper & taste), carob (calcium), slippery elm (swollen sinus), bee pollen (vitamin B), nutritional yeast (vitamin B), stevia (natural sweetener), mountain salt (sodium chloride), horsetail (silica) and vitamin C (detox).

I put olive oil or hemp seed oil and rosemary on my steamed broccoli. I put fenugreek, cumin, coriander, cayenne, and garlic in my sautés. In the winter, I take cod liver oil (vitamin D3). I try to get to know your supplier and the origin.

Beware that some supplements can be unintentionally contaminated with heavy metals and or may even be adulterated with other substances. Supplements are not the answer to ill health or to unhealthy eating habits. The answer is first to modify eating habits. Regarding supplements, if you use them, then it is better to start low and go slow. The fact that a little is good does not mean that more is better. I am not selling supplements.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The most frequently asked questions (FAQ) and answers are here, some with links to references with the answers, possibly with this FAQ page as an example or possibly another page. This page is a work in process.

Question: Who am I?

I am a professional technical writer, trainer, and commercial translator. I am also a self-taught health coach and nutritionist. My being self-taught irritates some health professionals like a fly in their soup. I also have a certificate from an accredited part-time nutrition school in Belgium. By reading many books, attending conferences, and trying things, I collected ideas, put them into practice for myself, gained health, lost weight, and felt better. I would like to diffuse these ideas and the related methods and recipes. On the other hand, what works for me may not work for you. Nothing works for everybody; however, these ideas and the related methods make it possible for you to personalize your nutrition, to forget about calories, to gain health, and to lose weight.

Question: Why believe me?

Because these ideas and the related methods work. I am simply the messenger. You do not need to believe me. To verify, you can read the books, studies, and articles in the references. Many of these books were written by unconventional medical doctors. By the end of their careers, they had collected many observations and noticed patterns that confirm their ideas about health via food. I simply read their books and summarized them in a set of articles and also added recipes.

Question: What is my self-interest?

This website is a hobby for me for now, for my health, and for commercial services health coaching later, but only if the first customer’s forecast revenue will pay for the yearly fixed costs (overhead) of self-employment, legal administration, and tax compliance. 

Question: How long does it take to see results?

If you try one idea, such as food combining, an acid-alkaline balance, or blood type eating, with discipline, then there is an eighty percent chance that you will see measurable results in three weeks or less. If you try four ideas, such as detox and the other three, continuously, then there is a ninety-nine percent chance that you will see measurable results, such as weight loss, and will feel better, in three weeks or less. I can guarantee this, conditionally.

Question: Do you practice what you preach?

First of all, I am not preaching anything. There is no moral judgement, guilt, or shame implied in any of these ideas and articles. I am not offering personal advice. Depending on availability, it is mostly your choice  what you eat or do not eat. Second, yes, for my health, I tend to follow these methods, and mostly I do eat according to these ideas, using the basic recipes. My health is my greatest treasure.

Question: This method is too complicated, so why do I push this?

Answer: Again, I am not trying to impose any of these ideas. I do not expect you to do anything. What you eat or do not eat is your choice. The question is, what do you value more – your health or your habits? If you value your health more, then it is possible to apply these ideas gradually, one-by-one, week-by-week or month-by-month. Then see how you feel. For simple, practical details, read the “Quick & easy” recipes. 

Question: This costs too much. How can I possibly feed myself and my family on a budget?

Answer: Eating eggs or small portions of healthy, high-quality hamburger, turkey, or liver can be an economic option. For details, read this Guide to Eating Paleo on a Budget. HealthViaFood is oriented towards carnivores, but if you are a vegan, then oatmeal, rice, beans, lentils, buckwheat, peas, and alfalfa or soy sprouts can be healthy and less expensive than processed foods. 

To save money, on a strict household budget, you could plan your meals weekly or every three days. Then shop around, and buy your food according to your plan. If you buy local vegetables and fruits when they are in season, or else grow your own, then they cost less. Buying directly from local farmers can be less expensive, depending on the transport. Community-supported agriculture can also be an economic option.

Even in a cold winter, root vegetables, such as carrots, parsnips, and turnips, are often in season. You can save money by buying nuts and seeds in bulk and buying fresh or frozen ingredients and then preparing them yourself. This avoids the cost of buying packaged processed meals and heating them in the microwave

One reason that certain foods, particularly processed foods, are so cheap is that they are subsidized. The price does not reflect the true cost, including the subsidies, the de-mineralization of the soil, and some often unsavory labor practices. If you believe that “if God had meant for me to cook, then why did he invent restaurants?“, then even you can learn to make smoothies, to cut and steam vegetables, and to cook omelets.

The price of bad health often greatly exceeds the costs of vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, and either eggs and beef, or else rice, beans, grains, and legumes, even organic. By the way, on average over one year, you eat more or less one thousand kilograms of food (about two thousand two hundred pounds). Do you really think that this does not affect your health?

Question: What do I eat and drink to maintain my health myself?

Answer: For my health, mostly I drink smoothies (or lemonade), eat steamed vegetables and raw fruit, cook omelets (or sautés of beef, turkey or liver) with onions, spinach, and mushrooms, eat nuts and seeds, and flavor with a liberal use of herbs and spices. My shopping list of foods I eat is OptimalFoodsforMyHealth. This list also includes foods I avoid. Occasionally, I contradict myself for various reasons. My favorite contradiction is dark chocolate, which has some sugar. Also, contrary to blood type eating, I eat coconut oil, Brazil nuts, and drink apple cider vinegar. What works for me may not work for you. I suggest that you think for yourself, and make your own choices.

Of course, complementary exercise is healthy too.

Question: What supplements do I take?

Answer: In my opinion, my health depends mostly on eating what is healthy for me and then only possibly on supplements. The best supplements for me are good-quality herbs and spices, such as ginger, clove, parsley, rosemary, thyme, garlic, cayenne pepper, fenugreek, cumin, and coriander. I also enjoy herbal tea of nettle, horsetail, dandelion, peppermint, and stevia.

If I take a supplement, I tend to pulse it. In other words, I take it for a week, then stop for a few days, then take it again for a week, then stop, and so on. If I take a supplement, I first ask myself: why? What do I hope to get from this food, spice, or supplement?

If available, sometimes I add one or more of the following foods, spices, and supplements to my daily smoothies (for these reasons): he shou wu (zinc), chlorella (magnesium & detox), Brazil nuts (selenium), clove (manganese), ginger (copper & taste), carob (calcium), slippery elm (swollen sinus), bee pollen (vitamin B), nutritional yeast (vitamin B), stevia (natural sweetener), mountain salt (sodium chloride), horsetail (silica) and vitamin C (detox).

I usually put olive oil or hemp seed oil and rosemary on my steamed broccoli, after turning off the heat. I usually put fenugreek, cumin, coriander, cayenne, and garlic in my sautés, also after turning off the heat. In the winter, I take cod liver oil (vitamin D3). I like to try to get to know the supplier and the origin.

Beware that some supplements can be unintentionally contaminated with heavy metals and or may even be adulterated with other substances. In my opinion, supplements are not the answer to unhealthy eating habits. The answer is first to modify eating habits. Regarding supplements, if you use them, then it is better to start low and go slow. The fact that a little is good does not mean that more is better. I am not selling supplements.

error: Write me, if you would like to copy this.